Only a few days left to help save the Fraser River

Type:  Announcements  

 Cut and paste this letter into an email, add your name, address and phone number and email it to wildlife.comm@state.co.us TODAY. Thank you for your help.

 

May 24, 2011

 

Division of Wildlife Commissioners

6060 Broadway

Denver, CO 80216

wildlife.comm@state.co.us

 

Dear Madam or Sir:

I am writing concerning the upcoming recommendation that you will make with regard to the Moffat Project Permit process. I’m writing you because I am someone who appreciates the 

beauty and importance of the Fraser River for the economic and natural well-being of the 

environment in Grand County. I’m concerned about the devastating impact of the proposed 

diversion by Denver Water, which will increase to 80% the diversions from the Fraser River to the East Slope. 

The needs to keep the River healthy should come ahead of any diversion right that Denver Water has. Without a healthy River, fishing will be impacted, tourists will have less reason to come to Grand County, and fish and wildlife will have a challenged survival. Denver Water’s right should not come at the detriment of others.

The requirements placed on Denver Water to be granted a permit should include:

• temperature monitoring paid for by Denver Water but done by independent parties 

• requirement for Denver Water to provide additional stream flow during periods when water temperatures are stressing fish, the timing of which should be done by an independent party 

• flushing flows to cleanse the stream of sediment and provide for healthy spawning beds and riparian habitat

• provision of minimum flow in the River in an amount to keep healthy levels such that a dry up condition never occurs even if watering restrictions are in place in Denver 

• revenue sharing to a locally-controlled water authority to provide funds for in-stream improvements and other mitigation

This is the last chance to save the Fraser River from probable extinction. Denver Water has not been required to consider mitigation issues while they currently take 60% of the River flow. We cannot allow them to have no meaningful requirement if the goal is keep the River healthy going forward. 

Sincerely,